ARIN-PPML Message

[arin-ppml] Application requests for IPv6?

Barron,

It actually isn't. IPv4 is ONE of many ways you can qualify for IPv6 space from ARIN.
There is a transition in end-user policies under way, and, from the sound of what you are describing,
you also have the option of applying as an ISP which gives you even more policy options.

I would suggest a careful reading of the Number Resource Policy Manual.

Specifically, section 6 covers IPv6 allocations (ISPs) and assignments (end users).

If you have any questions after reviewing the manual, the ARIN Registration Services Help
desk is available to assist you with clarifications and to help you find the best way to
match your institution to the appropriate policy.

Owen

On Feb 10, 2011, at 7:47 PM, Barron Hulver wrote:

> 
> I don't read this list enough to be fully informed on all the issues regarding application requests for IPv6 end-user address space, so please pardon me if my understanding is not correct.  We have a medium-sized end-user network and the number of IPs used will continue to grow as more mobile devices support Wi-Fi and other devices connect to the network (e.g. more game systems, printers, TVs, etc.) We have a legacy address space (class B or /16).  For historical reasons IPs are assigned throughout the address space (sparsely populated) and it would be quite a bit of work to condense this.  We have not signed the legacy resources agreement.
> 
> I understand the advantage of conserving routing table space due to a hierarchical addressing/routing structure.  However, we would like to obtain an IPv6 allocation from ARIN so that in the future we do not have to go through the work of renumbering devices with static IPs (e.g. servers) and reconfiguring security devices (e.g. firewalls) if we decide to switch ISPs.  Also, in the future it is likely that we will want to be multihomed because so many of our important services are moving to the cloud (e.g. Google Apps for Edu and Google Marketplace applications).  We are probably not alone in our thinking.
> 
> We started deploying IPv6 about two years ago after we obtained an assignment from our ISP, OARnet (Ohio Academic Resources Network).  We have the important services ready (DNS, DHCP, routing, firewalls, NTP, etc) and we have a token web server up (http://www.ipv6.oberlin.edu).
> 
> From my limited perspective it seems that a request for end-user IPv6 address space from ARIN is tied to IPv4 address space and that may be hindering deployment.  An end-user organization should be able to obtain an IPv6 allocation independent of IPv4 allocations.  It sounds like 2010-8 will decouple this and is a step in the right direction.
> 
> 
> Barron
> 
> Barron Hulver
> Director of Networking, Operations, and Systems
> Center for Information Technology
> Oberlin College
> 148 West College Street
> Oberlin, OH  44074
> 440-775-8798
> Barron.J.Hulver at oberlin.edu
> http://www2.oberlin.edu/staff/bhulver/
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> NRPM 6.5.8.1 offers several ways for an end user organization to qualify foran IPv6 assignment from ARIN.  The criteria that most often applies is when the organization can "qualify for an IPv4 assignment or allocation from ARIN under the IPv4 policy currently in effect".  There is no requirement to have a signed RSA/LRSA under this criteria.  An organization can qualify for IPv6, regardless of whether they have existing IPv4 space, as long as it can meet the criteria of ANY existing IPv4 policy in effect.  Once qualified, if they choose to proceed, they are assigned the IPv6 resources under the standard RSA.
> 
> FYI,
> /John
> 
> John Curran
> President and CEO
> ARIN
> 
> 
> 6.5.8.1. Criteria
> To qualify for a direct assignment, an organization must:
> a. not be an IPv6 LIR; and
> b. qualify for an IPv4 assignment or allocation from ARIN
> under the IPv4 policy currently in effect, or demonstrate
> efficient utilization of all direct IPv4 assignments and
> allocations, each of which must be covered by any current
> ARIN RSA, or be a qualifying Community Network as
> defined in Section 2.8, with assignment criteria defined in
> section 6.5.9. .
> 
> 
> 
> 
> >From the NRPM:
> 
> 6.5.8.1. Criteria
> To qualify for a direct assignment, an organization must:
> not be an IPv6 LIR; and
> qualify for an IPv4 assignment or allocation from ARIN under the IPv4 policy currently in effect, or demonstrate efficient utilization of all direct IPv4 assignments and allocations, each of which must be covered by any current ARIN RSA, or be a qualifying Community Network as defined in Section 2.8, with assignment criteria defined in section 6.5.9.
> 
> 
> So, if you're not already an IPv6 LIR (ISP) then you have to meet ONE of the criteria from section b:
> 
> 	+	Qualify for IPv4 under existing policy currently in effect
> or	+	demonstrate efficient utilization of all IPv4 assignments and allocations with each being
> 		covered by an RSA or LRSA.
> or	+	Be a qualifying Community Network as defined in Section 2.8.
> 
> Note that the first one and third one do not require your IPv4 space to be covered by RSA or
> LRSA.
> 
> In addition to this, this policy will soon be superseded by 2010-8 which will replace it with
> the following text:
> 
> 6.5.8. Direct assignments from ARIN to end-user organizations
> 
> 6.5.8.1 Initial Assignment Criteria
> 
> Organizations may justify an initial assignment for addressing devices
> directly attached to their own network infrastructure, with an intent
> for the addresses to begin operational use within 12 months, by meeting
> one of the following criteria:
> 
> a. Having a previously justified IPv4 end-user assignment from ARIN or
> one of its predecessor registries, or;
> 
> b. Currently being IPv6 Multihomed or immediately becoming IPv6
> Multihomed and using an assigned valid global AS number, or;
> 
> c. By having a network that makes active use of a minimum of 2000 IPv6
> addresses within 12 months, or;
> 
> d. By having a network that makes active use of a minimum of 200 /64
> subnets within 12 months, or;
> 
> e. By providing a reasonable technical justification indicating why IPv6 addresses from an ISP or other LIR are unsuitable.
> 
> Examples of justifications for why addresses from an ISP or other LIR
> may be unsuitable include, but are not limited to:
> 
> ? An organization that operates infrastructure critical to life safety
> or the functioning of society can justify the need for an assignment
> based on the fact that renumbering would have a broader than expected
> impact than simply the number of hosts directly involved. These would
> include: hospitals, fire fighting, police, emergency response, power or
> energy distribution, water or waste treatment, traffic management and
> control, etc?
> ? Regardless of the number of hosts directly involved, an organization
> can justify the need for an assignment if renumbering would affect 2000
> or more individuals either internal or external to the organization.
> ? An organization with a network not connected to the Internet can
> justify the need for an assignment by documenting a need for guaranteed
> uniqueness, beyond the statistical uniqueness provided by ULA (see RFC
> 4193).
> ? An organization with a network not connected to the Internet, such as
> a VPN overlay network, can justify the need for an assignment if they
> require authoritative delegation of reverse DNS.
> 
> This version will remove the requirement for RSA/LRSA on the IPv4 space
> altogether.
> 
> Owen
> 
> 
> 
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