[arin-ppml] Of interest?

William Herrin bill at herrin.us
Thu May 16 16:02:49 EDT 2019


On Thu, May 16, 2019 at 12:18 PM Ronald F. Guilmette <rfg at tristatelogic.com>
wrote

> In message <AA5C1AC3-9338-4FEB-9F1F-A092449CABB7 at delong.com>,
> Owen DeLong <owen at delong.com> wrote:
>
> >> You're supposesd to formally register to do business in each and every
> >> state where you have a physical nexus, even if it is only a rented
> mailbox.
> >
> >It's pretty common these days to not have a physical nexus in lots of
> states
> >where you still conduct business.
>
> Absolutely correct.  And indeed, Amazon is, I think, *not* registered
> to do business in *many* states that it accepts orders from.
>
> But everywhere that it has a tangible physical footprint, it *is*
> registered, as it must be, under the law.
>

Until you have W2 employees sitting somewhere or a retail space where
customers show up, you generally don't have enough of a physical presence
for the locality to notice or care. ARIN, for example, is registered in
Virginia. AFAIK, they will not have to register as a Texas business in
order to hold ARIN 44 in Austin this October though if they sold things -at
the convention- then they would.

https://statutes.capitol.texas.gov/Docs/BO/htm/BO.9.htm#9.251

Sec. 9.251.  ACTIVITIES NOT CONSTITUTING TRANSACTING BUSINESS IN THIS
STATE.
(2)  holding a meeting of the entity's managerial officials, owners, or
members or carrying on another activity concerning the entity's internal
affairs;


Technically, dotting the i's and crossing the t's, you should be registered
with the locality everywhere you're running an EC2 instance. Your electrons
are there and your tax money should be too. Good luck getting Amazon to
tell you where those are let alone actually doing it.


That was my point.  Thse sock puppet companies that were registered
> as part of this overall Micfo fraud were *not* even bloody registered
> in the states they claimed to be headquartered in, either now or,
> EVEN AT THE TIME WHEN ARIN WAS ISSUING THEM RESOURCES.
>

They were so-called "aged shelf companies." Look up the term, it's actually
quite fascinating.

Regards,
Bill Herrin


-- 
William Herrin
bill at herrin.us
https://bill.herrin.us/
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