[arin-ppml] Automatic IPv6 Eligibility

Owen DeLong owen at delong.com
Thu Aug 13 17:31:24 EDT 2015


As an ISP, you pay the higher of the two annual fees, so if your IPv4 is $16,000/year and your IPv6 is $2,000, you pay $16,000.
If your IPv4 is $500/year and your IPv6 is $2,000, you pay $2,000.

Owen

> On Aug 11, 2015, at 19:14 , Mike Hammett <arin at ics-il.net> wrote:
> 
> I had thought that at one point the IPv6 allocation was free for ISPs, but that deal expired at one point and it was now up to us to pay for both allocations. I'm not complaining, just seeking clarification since we're talking about getting IPv6 eligibility, costs, etc.
> 
> 
> -----
> Mike Hammett
> Intelligent Computing Solutions
> http://www.ics-il.com <http://www.ics-il.com/>
> 
>  <https://www.facebook.com/ICSIL> <https://plus.google.com/+IntelligentComputingSolutionsDeKalb> <https://www.linkedin.com/company/intelligent-computing-solutions> <https://twitter.com/ICSIL>
> 
> Midwest Internet Exchange
> http://www.midwest-ix.com <http://www.midwest-ix.com/>
> 
>  <https://www.facebook.com/mdwestix> <https://www.linkedin.com/company/midwest-internet-exchange> <https://twitter.com/mdwestix>
> 
> From: "Randy Carpenter" <rcarpen at network1.net>
> To: "Seth Mattinen" <sethm at rollernet.us>
> Cc: arin-ppml at arin.net
> Sent: Tuesday, August 11, 2015 9:11:40 PM
> Subject: Re: [arin-ppml] Automatic IPv6 Eligibility
> 
> 
> ----- On Aug 11, 2015, at 8:43 PM, Seth Mattinen sethm at rollernet.us wrote:
> 
> > On 8/11/15 14:43, Alfie Cleveland wrote:
> >> Hello,
> >>
> >> I’m requesting comment in regards to automatically make organisations
> >> eligible for IPv6 if they hold justified IPv4 space. This similar to
> >> Section 9.3.1. of the [APNIC-127] APNIC Internet Number Resource
> >> Policies. I feel that if organisations were able to receive a /48 for
> >> each /24 they hold, then it would help expedite the rollout of IPv6.
> >> Organisations currently have two choices - continue to use IPv4, or
> >> spend valuable time on applying for IPv6 space. IPv6 space is clearly in
> >> abundance - and this could potentially help slow the exhaustion of IPv4.
> >>
> > 
> > 
> > I got my /32 IPv6 allocation in late 2009 and end user /48 in 2007 and I
> > don't remember having to do much to qualify for them other than ask. Has
> > this changed?
> 
> No. If you have IPv4 space already, it is incredibly easy to get IPv6. Getting the default /48 as an end-user is about as automatic as it could be, and qualifying for more is not much more effort if you have multiple sites.
> 
> The only issue is that for end-users, you now have to pay an additional $100 per year for the IPv6 assignment.
> 
> -Randy
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