[ppml] 2005-1:Multi-national Business Enablement

Owen DeLong owen at delong.com
Sat Apr 23 03:28:41 EDT 2005


> Let's make a nice normal typical example of a 'multi-national business':
> 
> Thus there is a company lets name it Example Corp.
> This company has offices (read: sites) all around the world (New York,
> Amsterdam, Paris, London, Tokyo, Canberra, Seoul, Lima, etc). Every site
> has their own admins so they want a /48 per site, just like every
> enduser with a dsl line, cellphone, or whatever connectivity method gets
> a /48. As this company is large it also has a lot of employees, and
> these like to dial in to the company network using VPN's. Thus everytime
> a employee connects, this employees network wants to get connected to
> the company network and thus the VPN gets a /48 routed over it too.
> 
Um... generally, the company should be giving /64s to the employees, VPNs,
etc., not /48s.  Every end user with a DSL line, generally, should also be
getting a /64 unless they have need of multiple networks, in which case,
a /48 would be justified.

> Effectively this company will thus need a /32 or similar large sized
> block, just like Google and Microsoft amongst others already have.
> 
Not necessarily, however, this example is _NOT_ the example that 2005-1
is targeted for.  This example could be an LIR.  Now, if the company wants
to treat each site as a separate ORG, then, those sites might, individually
be eligible for /48s under 2005-1.

> Now a fun part. The site in Lima doesn't have that much connectivity, it
> has only a 2mbit SAT uplink. The site in Paris is also not very well
> connected, only a 10mbit leased line.
> 
> The webservers need a 1Gbit connection, because a lot of French people
> are connecting to it etc. Those webservers are located in New York.
> 
> Now where are you going to do your BGP announcements?
> 
> Do remind that the company gets a single /32 and are not supposed to be
> announcing multiple /48's out of that, as that will break the whole idea
> of aggregation. Also keep in mind that if you only announce it in New
> York that traffic from the employees summer house in Nice will flow over
> New York to Paris, introducing a nice 160ms latency for his SSH
> connection. If you announce it in Paris, without limiting it to the
> peers, because then you introduce the latency again, then a lot of
> french people and surrounding areas will go over that teeny 10mbit
> leased line, while they all might want to download that super cool new
> product advertisement movie, which does fit over the 1Gbit pipe at the
> webservers but does not fit over the 10mbit leased line...
> 
If you're going to be an LIR, it comes with the responsibility for
building a backbone sufficient to meet your Intradomain connectivity
needs.  If your dealing with multiple organizations that are diversly
connected, then, topologically they are many small organizations,
not one large one.

Owen


-- 
If it wasn't crypto-signed, it probably didn't come from me.
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