ARIN-PPML Message

[ppml] 2002-3: Micro-Assignments for Multihomed Networks

This policy proposal is being re-posted to the public
policy mailing list to encourage continued discussion.
This policy proposal was previously discussed on this
mailing list and at the ARIN X Public Policy Meeting.
Following previous discussions on this mailing list
and at the ARIN X Public Policy Meeting, it has been
determined consensus to pass this proposal as a new
policy has not yet been achieved.

The authors have modified the text to clarify the 
intent and purpose of the proposal.

Member Services
American Registry for Internet Numbers (ARIN)

### * ###

Policy Proposal 2002-3: Micro-Assignments for Multihomed Networks

Modify Policy:
  End User Assignments

Old text:
  The minimum block of IP address space assigned by ARIN is
  a /20. If assignments smaller than /20 are needed, end-users
  should contact their upstream provider. 

New text:
  If an end-user is not multi-homed, the minimum block of IP
  address space assigned by ARIN is a /20. If assignments 
  smaller than /20 are needed, end-users should contact their 
  upstream provider.

  If an end-user is multi-homed, and has an ARIN assigned
  ASN, the minimum block of IP address space assigned by
  ARIN is a /22.  If assignments smaller than a /22 are
  needed, end users should contact their upstream provider.

Problem Summary:
  Many end-user organizations are choosing to multi-home
  for reliability reasons.  At the same time, many are
  using technologies such as NAT, or load balancers that
  reduce the need for external IP space.  These groups
  are forced today to take one of two actions:

     1) Use IP space from one of their upstreams on both
        connections.  This can lead to load balancing
        issues, and also makes the end-user more dependent
        on the ISP who assigned the space.  The ISP's
        business problems, for instance could force downtime
        and/or renumbering.

     2) "Waste" address space (often by not using the 
        technologies that conserve it) in order to qualify
        for a /20 under the current policy.

        In order to allow people to both conserve address
        space, and reap the benefits of multi-homing the
        minimum size assignment for those who do multi-home
        should be made smaller.