ARIN-discuss Message

[arin-discuss] Trying to Understand IPV6

try:

<http://getipv6.info/>

and see where that leads you? If things are missing I'm sure
additions/pointers/etc would be welcome...

-chris

On Mon, Sep 13, 2010 at 1:46 PM, Scott Morris <swm at emanon.com> wrote:
> There really isn't a great repository for things, at least that I've
> seen...  But keep in mind that the binary works the same in IPv6 as it does
> in IPv4.  :)
>
> So when you look at a /21, do you look at it as 2000'ish IPv4 addresses?
> (At which point a single /64 is more than enough)
> Or do you look at it as 8 x /24 networks (at which point a /61 is the
> technical equivalent)
>
> /64 is used by many people as the de facto "network" addressing for any
> subnet because of all the magical EUI-64 addressing to work (e.g. less whiny
> customer calls = better).  But anyone doing DHCPv6 will quickly learn that a
> /64 is a SERIOUS amount of addresses than can be broken down internally to
> any variation they really feel like.  (/126 = /30, etc.)
>
> So to best answer that questions, you have to know a little about your
> customer and how they'll use the addresses.  /56 seems to be the way many
> folks are going with things, but that's 256 /64 networks or the veritable
> "boatload" of addresses that will be wasted beyond belief.
>
> Remember in the old days everyone gave out IPv4 addresses like candy.  Back
> then 4.2 billion addresses seemed like a lot...  Today, 340 undecillion
> addresses seems like a lot... Times change though!
>
>
>
> Scott Morris, CCIEx4 (R&S/ISP-Dial/Security/Service Provider) #4713,
>
> CCDE #2009::D, JNCIE-M #153, JNCIS-ER, CISSP, et al.
>
> CCSI #21903, JNCI-M, JNCI-ER
>
> swm at emanon.com
>
> Knowledge is power.
>
> Power corrupts.
>
> Study hard and be Eeeeviiiil......
>
> On 9/13/10 1:24 PM, Schnell, Darryl wrote:
>
> Can anyone recommend a good IPV6 website for Beginners? I’ve read about
> eight web sites which say the same things and I feel like my head is going
> to explode. I guess the problem I’m having is trying to understand how an
> IPv4 CIDR notation translates in an IPv6 CIDR in order to fill out ARIN IPV6
> Allocation Template future usage section. My actual question is –
>
>
>
> If I assigned a customer say an IPV4 /21 in IPV6 this would translate into a
> /56? If I’m not mistaken a /56 would translate into something like 65,000
> host addresses? That just seems like a lot of hosts to me, especially when
> most of the time I’m working with networks that are /26 or smaller. I guess
> my big problem is confusion over labeling. What would be the equivalent of a
> /26, /27, /28 or have we done away with blocks that small and simply would
> just assign a /56 instead?
>
>
>
> Does any of the gibberish I wrote make any sense at all?
>
>
>
> Any help anyone can offer is much appreciated.
>
>
>
> D -
>
>
>
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